Property Crimes Category

How to get a job after jail

People who are arrested for and eventually convicted of criminal offenses know that their futures will likely be impacted by the experience. However, they also deserve to believe that they can successfully move beyond their criminal past and rebuild their lives. Integral to doing this is getting a job so they can support themselves and their families. People who have spent time in jail or even in prison should not automatically assume they have no hope of doing this as it is very possible to find employment even with a…
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Arson and aggravated arson: What are the differences?

With the recent horrendous California fires, it goes without saying that you should be very careful indeed about what you do whenever you are outdoors. If you start a fire, you could find yourself charged with arson or aggravated arson. As FindLaw explains, the California Penal Code provides for two ways in which you could be held criminally responsible for any fire you start. Arson elements and penalties Should you find yourself charged with arson, understand that virtually all forms of this crime constitute a felony. To convict you of “basic” arson,…
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How does California define property crimes?

The first important point to understand if you have been charged with criminal activity in Los Angeles is the need to comprehend exactly what type of crime you are being charged with. The general public might assume that crime is simply crime, yet from a legal perspective, there are crimes against persons, against public safety, and crimes against property. Knowing the type of activity you stand accused of might help you better comprehend why you are facing charges (if it is still unclear to you), and how to defend yourself…
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What are the differences between theft, robbery and burglary?

If you face theft charges in California, your specific charge may be for robbery or burglary as opposed to theft per se. As FindLaw explains, these three white collar crimes are similar to, but different from, each other, especially when it comes to what the prosecutor must prove in order to convict you. Theft, robbery and burglary all are property crimes. To convict you of theft, which also goes by the name of larceny, the prosecutor must prove that you stole someone’s personal property with the intent both to do so and…
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